Mowi has admitted that farmed salmon found in a beauty spot in south-west Norway came from one of its farms.

The fish were caught in watercourses in Rogaland and Agder  including Åna-Sira,  an area noted for its scenic charms.

The company has now told the Directorate of Fisheries that it was responsible for the escapes.

The Directorate said this is the second year in a row that farmed fish found in watercourses in the area could be traced back to the company.

Salmon escapes were a major issue in Norway two years ago, but there have been significant improvements since 2019, although they continue to make new from time to time.

Following the Rogaland escapes this summer the Directorate set out for samples to try to trace who was responsible.

Mowi has also collected samples of the escaped fish from Åna-Sira, which they have now had DNA analysed.

Of a total of 29 individuals that could be tested, all were found to belong to one of Mowi’s fishing groups.

The company itself  said that the group concerned came from a total of five cages at three of the company’s locations in nearby Flekkefjord, and corresponds with one of the fishing groups that was also tracked last year.

The Directorate said in 2020, Mowi analysed samples from about 40 farmed salmon and concluded that all the individuals were fish of a Mowi strain and that they came from four different fish groups.

These fishing groups were located at three different districts, again around Flekkefjord.

The Directorate is now planning an audit of the Mowi business in that district.

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